Bob Burger / The Domino Effect

Bob Burger

The Domino Effect (JEM)

http://www.jemrecords.com

Bob Burger is quite a busy guy. Aside from holding membership in New Jersey’s top band, The Weeklings, the singer, songwriter and multi-instrumentalist also claims an artistically satisfying solo career. Bob’s current and fifth album, The Domino Effect, files in as a stone-cold testimony to his passion and comprehension of prescriptive pop rock, especially of the late seventies, early eighties ilk.

Equipped with a melodic rasp situated in the vein of both Don Henley and Tom Petty, Bob conveys his attentively-crafted material in a spirited and coherent manner. Staying in form with the music, the lyrics – which reveal a psychological awareness often laced with humor – are direct and bleed with worldwide allure. 

Ignited by a blush of bluesy guitar riffs and swaying rhythms, “The Suicide King” lifts the lid on The Domino Effect in faultless fettle, tailgated by “Impression,” a new wave styled number sliced of scuttling keyboards and a repetitious but persistently-catchy beat. 

Gleaming with spark and light, “Even If You Don’t” and “Merely Beautiful” are first-class guitar based essays, deftly supported by cracking patterns and attractive hooks. Dictated by an urgent bounce and an infectious sing-a-long chorus, “Pain In The Ass” and the slinky and sinister groove of “The One-Eyed Jack” reel in as other outstanding cuts to be admired. 

A twangy country feel surrounds the toe-tapping timbre of “I’m Free,” and then there’s “Rock & Roll Band,” which proves to be a fitting end to the program. Vibrating with high energy, cool licks and in the pocket harmonies, the punchy track communicates Bob’s ongoing devotion to music, stating how playing in bands has kept him sane all these years. 

Powered by virile vocals, creative arrangements and skintight instrumentation, The Domino Effect harks back to the days when every song on an album exerted serviceable qualities. After hearing this perfected piece of ear candy, you’ll wonder why Bob Burger isn’t a big star. Perhaps The Domino Effect is the album that will glean him the riches he so obviously commands. 

THE EVERLASTING FIRST: Quick Takes For D (Music Edition)

Continuing a look back at my first exposure to a number of rock ‘n’ roll acts and superheroes (or other denizens of print or periodical publication), some of which were passing fancies, and some of which I went on to kinda like. They say you never forget your first time; that may be true, but it’s the subsequent visits–the second time, the fourth time, the twentieth time, the hundredth time–that define our relationships with the things we cherish. Ultimately, the first meeting is less important than what comes after that. But every love story still needs to begin with that first kiss.

DAWN

“Knock Three Times” was a huge AM radio hit when I was in sixth grade. When it played in the lunchroom at school, all the kids there naturally pounded on the table when the song prompted us to, y’know, knock three times. We were warned of dire consequences if we didn’t stop that infernal pounding, you worthless kids! As the song continued, I figured that I could toe the line and continue enjoying myself by playing air drums, and silently swatting the air instead of smacking the table.  Perfect plan, right? But Mr. Shannon saw the downward movement of my arms, and pronounced me guilty, my protests to the contrary be damned. I’ve never forgiven him, the rat!

THE dB’s

As a voracious reader of Trouser Press magazine in the early ’80s, I must have read all about The dB’s and their first two albums, Stands For Decibels and Repercussions. Probably. My first exposure to the group was two live tracks, “We Should Be In Bed” and “Death Garage,” on a live sampler LP called Start Swimming. A couple of years later, I fell in love with a dB’s album called Like This, which we played in-store when I worked at a record store in Buffalo circa 1985.  A few years later still, a reissue of Like This would become (with Past Masters, Volume Two by The Beatles) one of the first pair of CDs I ever owned. Saw The dB’s at Syracuse’s Lost Horizon in the late ’80s, as the final incarnation of the group was touring in support of its last album,  The Sound Of Music.

THE DEAD BOYS

THE DEAD BOYS:  Yesterday’s discussion of The Damned mentioned an album called New Wave, a sampler LP put out by the good folks at the Vertigo label. We’ll be coming back to that album in at least two more future editions of The Everlasting First, but it’s also where I first heard The Dead Boys (specifically “Sonic Reducer” and “All This And More,” two tracks from The Dead Boys’ debut album, Young, Loud & Snotty). My favorite Dead Boys track would ultimately be “Third Generation Nation,” the lead-off track from their second and final album, We Have Come For Your Children. Dead Boys lead singer Stiv Bators would later release an incredible cover of The Choir‘s pop classic “It’s Cold Outside,” and his version is The Greatest Record Ever Made

DAVE DEE, DOZY, BEAKY, MICK & TICH

I guess it’s easy to be snarky about the clunky pop music of Dave Dee, Dozy, Beaky, Mick & Tich, but I was intrigued by them. I believe the first mention of ’em I ever saw was in the booklet that accompanied a Sire Records double-album sampler called The History Of British Rock, Volume Two. That set didn’t contain any DDDBM&T, but just the mention of the group and a manic record called “Bend It” was enough to whet my appetite. I later found a used copy of the “Bend It” 45, but it didn’t make much of an impression on me, I fear. “Zabadak” also left me cold. But when I heard their song “Hold Tight” a few years later, I knew I’d found a new favorite. I’ve purchased CD reissues of three DDDBM&T albums, but the debut album (which includes “Hold Tight” and “You Make It Move”) is my go-to.

THE DICKIES

I’m sure I saw print ads for The Dickies’ album The Incredible Shrinking Dickies, and I probably saw it on the racks at various fine record retailers in the late ’70s. I knew the group’s repertoire of supercharged covers included a take on The Monkees‘ ace garage nugget “She,” but I don’t remember hearing any of it at the time. Which means my first Dickies sighting was on the Don Rickles sitcom C.P.O. Sharkey in 1978. My memory of that episode is that it was condescending and smarmy in its dismissal of punk rock, so screw ’em anyway. My favorite Don Rickles appearance was alongside his comic-book doppelganger Goody Rickels in the pages of Superman’s Pal, Jimmy Olsen, written and drawn by the King, Jack Kirby. The Dickies went on to much better thing beyond the aegis of C.P.O. Sharkey, and the group’s cover of The Banana Splits theme song has long been a favorite. TRAAA-LA-LAAAA, TRAAA-LA-LA-LAAAA! The Dickies also did an original power pop tune called “Rosemary” on their 1983 album Stukas Over Disneyland, and it’s one of the all-time great underrated pop tunes. 

THE DICTATORS

THE DICTATORS: Another group I first heard of via Phonograph Record Magazine, but my first taste of The Dictators’ music came via the unlikely venue of a film called Jabberwalk in 1977. My only memory of this weird, disjointed documentary (if that’s even what it was) is that it was…um, weird and disjointed. That, and it included footage of The Dictators performing a live rendition of “America The Beautiful” at the Miss Nude America beauty pageant. See, that’s how you break a band! At college in Brockport that September, I pestered campus station WBSU to play me some Dictators, and the jocks responded with the pretty ballad “Sleepin’ With The TV On,” from the group’s then-current Manifest Destiny album. Subsequent WBSU requests yielded tracks from The Dictators’ first album, Go Girl Crazy!

THE DRIFTERS

My first Drifters record was The Drifters’ Golden Greats, which I purchased in the mid-’80s (and which prompted me to remark with some frequency that, if we presume there must be music in Heaven, then we must presume the music in Heaven sounds like The Drifters). But my first exposure to The Drifters? “On Broadway.” That TV commercial for Radio Free Europe in the ’60s and ’70s. On Broadvay…!  ‘Nuff said.

TIP THE BLOGGER: CC’s Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Just Say Uncle

To Support The Art Of Dan Pavelich, Please Visit;

http://www.patreon.com/justsayuncle

Categories
Welcome

Greetings!

Thank you to our new friends and readers from; The United States, The Netherlands, The United Kingdom, Italy, Finland, Indonesia and Austria! All are welcome here!

CC’s All-Time Hot 100

Egged on my pal Fritz Van Leaven, here is my latest attempt to narrow down and cobble together a list of my all-time 100 favorite tracks. 

The exercise itself reminds me once again that I have way, waaaaay more than just 100 favorite tracks. The overall list of a mere 100 could vary on any given day, and in fact it omits a few tracks that were included in an all-time Top 40 I concocted just a few months ago. Consistency is overrated, though certain core tracks will always remain in my Hot 100. 

This is NOT the same as The Greatest Record Ever Made! With that duly noted, these are a few of my favorite tracks.

CC’s ALL-TIME Hot 100

Updated 6/7/2022

ALL DAY AND ALL OF THE NIGHT The Kinks

ALL FOR SWINGING YOU AROUND The New Pornographers

ALLISON ROAD The Gin Blossoms

ANOTHER SAD AND LONELY NIGHT The Bobby Fuller Four

ANY WAY YOU WANT IT The Dave Clark Five

BABY BLUE Badfinger

BABYSITTER The Ramones

BEG, BORROW AND STEAL The Rare Breed/The Ohio Express

BITTERSWEET The Hoodoo Gurus

BLITZKRIEG BOP The Ramones

CALIFORNIA NIGHTS Lesley Gore

CARBONA NOT GLUE The Ramones

CATCH US IF YOU CAN The Dave Clark Five

COULDN’T I JUST TELL YOU Todd Rundgren

CRYIN’ SHAME The Parties

DA-A-A-ANCE The Lambrettas

DO ANYTHING YOU WANNA DO Eddie and the Hot Rods

DO THE FREDDIE Freddie and the Dreamers

THE DOOR INTO SUMMER The Monkees

EMPTY HANGERS Anny Celsi

EVERYWHERE THAT I’M NOT Translator

THE FIRST CUT IS THE DEEPEST P.P. Arnold

FIRST PLANE HOME The Flamin’ Groovies

FIVE O’CLOCK WORLD The Vogues

GIRLS IN THEIR SUMMER CLOTHES Bruce Springsteen

GLAD ALL OVER The Dave Clark Five

GOD ONLY KNOWS The Beach Boys

GOD SAVE THE QUEEN The Sex Pistols

GOING DOWN TO LIVERPOOL The Bangles

A HARD DAY’S NIGHT The Beatles

HEART FULL OF SOUL The Yardbirds

HEARTS IN HER EYES The Searchers

HELP! The Beatles

HIGHWAY LINES Mannix

HIS LAST SUMMER The Barracudas

I CAN’T EXPLAIN The Who

I CAN’T LET GO The Hollies

I DON’T WANT TO GROW UP The Ramones

I DON’T WANT TO SPOIL THE PARTY The Beatles

I ONLY WANT TO BE WITH YOU Dusty Springfield

I TELL NO LIES The Shoutless

I’M GONNA MAKE YOU LOVE ME The Jayhawks

(I’M NOT YOUR) STEPPIN’ STONE The Monkees

IN THE CITY The Jam

IT’S COLD OUTSIDE Stiv Bators

IT’S MY LIFE The Animals

IT’S THE SAME OLD SONG The Four Tops

JOHNNY B. GOODE Chuck Berry

KICKS Paul Revere and the Raiders

KIM THE WAITRESS Material Issue

LAUGH, LAUGH The Beau Brummels

LIES The Knickerbockers

LOVE TO LOVE The Monkees

A MILLION MILES AWAY The Plimsouls

(MY GIRL) MARYANNE The Spongetones

THE NIGHT BEFORE The Beatles

NO PROMISE The Flashcubes

NO REPLY The Beatles

NOTHING REALLY MATTERS WHEN YOU’RE YOUNG Screen Test

ON BROADWAY The Drifters

PERSONALITY CRISIS The New York Dolls

PLEASANT VALLEY SUNDAY The Monkees

PLEASE PLEASE ME The Beatles

PORPOISE SONG (THEME FROM HEADThe Monkees

PROMISED LAND Chuck Berry

RAIN The Beatles

ROCK AND ROLL LOVE LETTER The Bay City Rollers

SAYING GOODBYE The Muffs

SEPTEMBER GURLS Big Star

SHAKE SOME ACTION The Flamin’ Groovies

SHE SAID SHE SAID The Beatles

SHEENA IS A PUNK ROCKER The Ramones

SHOUT IT OUT LOUD KISS

SOLITARY MAN Neil Diamond

SOUND OF THE RADIO Screen Test

ST. VALENTINE’S DAY MASSACRE The Cocktail Slippers

SYRACUSE SUMMER The Tearjerkers

THE TEARS OF A CLOWN Smokey Robinson and the Miracles

THANK YOU, GIRL [U.S. Capitol Records mix] The Beatles

THIS DIAMOND RING Sammy Ambrose

THIS YEAR’S GONNA BE OUR YEAR Eytan Mirsky

TIME HAS COME TODAY The Chambers Brothers

TIME WILL TELL Holly Golightly

TIRED OF WAITING FOR YOU The Kinks

TO SIR, WITH LOVE [MUSEUM OUTINGS MONTAGE] Lulu

TOMORROW NIGHT Shoes

THE TRANSYLVANIA TWIST Baron Daemon and the Vampires

TWENTY FOUR HOURS FROM TULSA Gene Pitney

UNCLE JOHN’S BAND The Grateful Dead

VACATION The Go-Go’s

WALK AWAY RENEE The Left Banke

WALK, DON’T RUN The Ventures

WATERLOO SUNSET The Kinks

WE GOT THE BEAT The Go-Go’s

WHAT AM I DOING HANGIN’ ‘ROUND? The Monkees

WHAT TIME IS IT The Jive Five

(WHAT’S SO FUNNY ‘BOUT) PEACE, LOVE & UNDERSTANDING Elvis Costello and the Attractions

WOULDN’T YOU LIKE IT The Bay City Rollers

YOU REALLY GOT ME The Kinks

YOU’RE GONNA MISS ME The 13th Floor Elevators

If you like what you see here on Boppin’ (Like The Hip Folks Do), please consider supporting this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon, or by visiting CC’s Tip Jar. Additional products and projects are listed here.

This Is Rock ‘n’ Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

I’m on Twitter @CafarelliCarl

Father Of The Brood

Just Say Uncle

Remembering My 100-Page FAKES! (DC Comics Spectaculars That Never Were)

Well over a year after posting my last 100-Page FAKE!, it occurs to me that I probably never made any official announcement that the series was kaput. I did mention their demise here, but otherwise I never really got around to bidding a proper farewell.

The series began in May of 2018, designed as a proudly fannish attempt to concoct a bunch of 1970s DC Comics 100-Page Super Spectaculars that never were. I announced the series’ transition from the original DC Comics-centric 100-Page FAKES! into the less-restricted (but ultimately still DC-centric) Spectacular Comics 100-Page Specials in April of 2020. I then concocted four monthly issues of Spectacular Comics, with the fourth and final issue posted on July 24, 2020.

At that time, I think I still intended to continue slappin’ these things together. But a few factors combined to make me re-think that intent, and ultimately abandon the concept entirely. The fake books were very time-consuming to create, and they became even more time-consuming when I liquidated my digital comics stash entirely. The final efforts were constructed from a mix of public-domain comics pages available on line and scans of comic books in my collection. Even with all of that, I might have continued doing them if a format change at Blogger hadn’t made the process so much clunkier to accomplish. The inconvenience was more than I was willing to bother messin’ with. Sayonara, FAKES! and Spectaculars.

But I’m glad I did them. They were a cool way to connect with my inner adolescent, the 12-15 year-old kid who loved DC’s 100-pagers in the ’70s, and wished there had been more of them. I wrote a history of DC’s (real-life) 100-pagers, and I felt I wanted to expand on the real world a little bit. Here are links to every one those fabrications:

Adventure Comics # 435
The Shadow # 6
Rima The Jungle Girl # 1
Wanted, The World’s Most Dangerous Villains # 4
The Brave And The Bold # 111
Detective Comics # 446
Justice, Inc. # 1
The Sandman # 1
The Phantom # 67
All-Star Comics # 58
Metal Men # 45
DC Special # 16 (Super-Heroes Battle Super Gorillas)

E-Man # 11

Secret Origins # 1

The Six Million Dollar Man # 1

Adventure Comics # 436

Secret Origins # 2

Detective Comics # 447

The Brave And The Bold # 118

Super-Hero Grab Bag # 1 (with The Seven Soldiers Of Victory)

Rima The Jungle Girl # 2

Adventure Comics # 437

DC Special # 14 (Wanted, The World’s Most Dangerous Villains)

Detective Comics # 448

Wanted: The Secret Society Of Super Villains # 1

The Shadow # 5

Detective Comics Special Edition

*MARVEL WEEK [in memory of STAN LEE]:

*Sub-Mariner # 72 [a DC-Marvel hybrid]

*Giant-Size Spider-Man # 3 [with Doc Savage]

*Marvel Feature # 1 [with The Defenders]

*Astonishing Tales # 1

Adventure Comics # 438

Adventure Comics # 439

Adventure Comics # 440

Adventure Comics # 441

Adventure Comics # 442

Adventure Comics # 443

Rima The Jungle Girl # 3

Detective Comics # 449

Detective Comics # 451

Adventure Comics # 444

Detective Comics # 452

Adventure Comics # 445

Detective Comics # 453

Adventure Comics # 446

Detective Comics # 454

Adventure Comics # 447

Detective Comics # 455

Adventure Comics # 448

Detective Comics # 456

Adventure Comics # 449

Adventure Comics # 450

Adventure Comics # 451

World’s Finest Comics # 245

Sensation Comics 100-Page Super Spectacular [starring Wonder Woman]

Green Arrow & The Black Canary 100-Page Super Spectacular

Adventure Comics # 452

Detective Comics # 457

The Brave And The Bold # 119

Batman # 262

Batman # 263

The Sandman # 2

The Sandman # 3

The Sandman # 4

The Sandman # 5

The Sandman # 6

All-Star Comics # 59

The Sandman # 7

Shazam! # 36

The Phantom # 68

Spectacular Comics 100-Page Special # 1

Spectacular Comics 100-Page Special # 2

Spectacular Comics 100-Page Special # 3

Spectacular Comics 100-Page Special # 4

From the Spectre to the Phantom, with a cast of multitudes: BatmanAquamanSpider-Man, the original Captain Marvelthe ShadowSupermanSuperboythe Justice Society of AmericaE-ManDaredevilDoc SavagePlastic ManWonder Womanthe Silver SurferBlue Beetlethe Lone Rangerthe Seven Soldiers of Victorythe SandmanRima the Jungle Girlthe Six Million Dollar ManSpy SmasherDial H For HEROMetal MenCaptain Americathe Bat SquadKa-ZarDick TracyBatgirlTorchyBulletman and BulletgirlDr. StrangeHawkmanBlackhawkBlack Canarythe Vigilantethe Creeperthe DefendersHydromanthe Elongated ManWildcatthe Doom PatrolDoll Man and Doll GirlIbis the Invinciblethe Boy CommandosSub-MarinerHot WheelsCaptain ActionZorroDetective ChimpJonny QuestGreen Arrowthe Secret Society of Super-Villains, and Astra, Girl of the Future, plus many more. It was mostly about DC, but it included properties DC licensed or acquired from QualityCharltonFawcettMattelIdealJerry Lewis, and The Chicago Tribune, and it included MarvelECComicoMighty ComicsFoxMLJLev Gleason, more from Charlton, and other purveyors of four-color fantasy. 

I regret I never got around to using Vampirella. But I did what I could, until the time came to move on. They weren’t real. But they were Spectacular.

TIP THE BLOGGER: CC’s Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey! If you buy from Amazon, consider making your purchases through links at Pop-A-Looza. A portion of your purchase there will go to support Boppin’ (Like The Hip Folks Do). Thinking Amazon? Think Pop-A-Looza.

This Is Rock ‘n’ Roll Radio with Dana & Carl airs Sunday nights from 9 to Midnight Eastern, on the air in Syracuse at SPARK! WSPJ 103.3 and 93.7 FM, and on the web at http://sparksyracuse.org/ You can read about our history here.

The many fine This Is Rock ‘n’ Roll Radio compilation albums are still available, each full of that rockin’ pop sound you crave. A portion of all sales benefit our perpetually cash-strapped community radio project:

Volume 1: download
Volume 2: CD or download
Volume 3: download
Volume 4: CD or download
Waterloo Sunset–Benefit For This Is Rock ‘n’ Roll Radio:  CD or download

I’m on Twitter @CafarelliCarl.

THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE: Behind The Wall Of Sleep

This chapter from my forthcoming book The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1) was originally distributed privately to my paid patrons on June 1, 2019. This is its first public appearance. You can become a patron of Boppin’ (Like The Hip Folks Do) for just $2 a month.
An infinite number of songs can each be THE greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Today, THIS is THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE!

THE SMITHEREENS: “Behind The Wall Of Sleep”
Single from the album Especially For You, Enigma Records, 1986
Beauty and sadness.

These are the things our lives can offer us: the beauty of art and appreciation, friendship, creation, participation, romance, passion, family, trust; the sadness of loss, longing, distance, frailty, mortality, disillusion. The parameters of our experience in this world are rendered in large part by our unequal shares in the beauty of sadness and the sadness of beauty.

There are myriad ways this dance of beauty and sadness can manifest. In this moment, let us speak of its relationship with a band called The Smithereens, and the fans who found the beauty within their sadness.

The Smithereens were from Carteret, New Jersey, blown into the scene in 1980. Drumming by Dennis Diken. Bass by Mike Mesaros. Guitars by Jim Babjak and Pat DiNizio. They channeled The Beatles, The Kinks, Buddy Holly, The Beau Brummels, and everything that was ever cool in pop music. All sang, but DiNizio was the principal songwriter and the guy in front, his voice spinning tales of love lost, found, unrequited, doomed from the start, or discarded with cruel indifference. The hearts on their sleeves had been battered. But the beat went on.

Their first release was a 1980 EP, Girls About Town, establishing the group’s raison d’être by collecting four songs with “girl” in the title (three DiNizio compositions and a cover of The Beach Boys’ “Girl Don’t Tell Me”). The Beauty And Sadness EP followed in 1983, with their first LP Especially For You reaching retail in 1986.

Especially For You is a stunning work, inspired by the British Invasion, influenced by punk and new wave, informed by the inner grit of classic soul, yet in unerring pursuit of its own belligerent vision. “Cigarette” is a devastatingly poignant portrait of true love slipping away, “Strangers When We Meet” and “Time And Time Again” bop like nobody’s natural business, and “Blood And Roses” broods like a bad boy who’s given up on being good. 

The album also includes “Behind The Wall Of Sleep,” a darkly fascinating snapshot of obsession, casually emanating hints of danger while falling in too deep to dream of rescue, another paperback-ready slice of pulpy pop noir.

She was tall and cool and pretty
And she dressed as black as coal
If she asked me to, I’d murder
I would gladly lose my soul

MTV and FM radio succumbed to The Smithereens’ alchemic alloy of menace and yearning. There was more to come, public interest probably peaking with the group’s third album 11 in 1989. Although The Smithereens continued to create smoldering works of cantankerous brilliance even into this newfangled new millennium, a crowd of people turned away. The masses were lost. The music of The Smithereens became the possession solely of its faithful, its diehard fans.

Fans like The Front Line.

I only know this story second hand, as it was related to me by some of these Smithereens fans who called themselves by that name, The Front Line. The Front Line was a small group of fans, three couples, who saw The Smithereens as often as opportunity allowed. They called themselves The Front Line because that’s where they were at a Smithereens show: fixed in their spots in front of the stage, with only the sweet veil of dreams (beyond the wall of sleep) separating them from this band they loved; Rich and Kathy Firestone in front of Jim Babjak, John and Melissa Palmer before Pat DiNizio, Steven and Gail Molinari in the line of sight of Mike Mesaros. The band knew them and appreciated them. How could anyone not love and appreciate The Front Line?

The Molinaris divorced. Gail Molinari was taken by cancer in 2014. Within the band itself, Jim Babjak’s beloved wife Betty was also claimed by cancer in 2016. Pat DiNizio died in December of 2017.

Now I lie in bed and think of her
Sometimes I even weep
And I dream of her behind the wall of sleep

The night Pat DiNizio died, I was otherwise occupied. I was waiting in the ER with my mother, who had fallen at home for the second time in a matter of days. Beauty and sadness. While in the ER, I received messages from the Firestones, going through their own process of dealing with impending bad news, as DiNizio slipped away. 

Now I know I’m one of many who would like to be your friend
And I’ve got to find a way to let you know I’m not like them

Our obsessions drive us, and that’s not necessarily a bad thing. Our interests can give us focus and delight, spark, comfort, perhaps even meaning, or at least a step toward meaning. Neither beauty nor sadness alone can tell our stories. And without them, we have no stories to tell, no life to live. We have no other refuge. We persevere. We have nothing else we can do, and nowhere else we can go.

Not even behind the wall of sleep.

“Behind The Wall Of Sleep” written by Pat DiNizio, D-Tunes Music/La Rana Music BMI

TIP THE BLOGGER: CC’s Tip Jar!

You can support this blog by becoming a patron on Patreon: Fund me, baby! 

Hey, Carl’s writin’ a book! The Greatest Record Ever Made! (Volume 1) will contain 100 essays (and then some) about 100 tracks, plus two bonus instrumentals, each one of ’em THE greatest record ever made. An infinite number of records can each be the greatest record ever made, as long as they take turns. Updated initial information can be seen here: THE GREATEST RECORD EVER MADE! (Volume 1)

Just Say Uncle

To Support The Art Of Dan Pavelich, Please Visit;

http://www.patreon.com/justsayuncle